You’ve probably heard the expression “work like a dog” and we want to shed some light on some of the hardest workers, with four legs. Working dogs are all around us, from airport security to disaster rescue missions, canines are more than just a wonderful companion. They are an integral part of making human society function at its best.

Canines trained for bomb detection in combat or military zones have a 98% success rate in detecting such dangers. Many dogs who have experienced war often go home with their partner and have been known to help military and law enforcement veterans with PTSD symptoms. (Learn more about our friend Joe Locus, veteran police officer who’s service dog, Jinky, fills this enormous role in Joe’s struggle with PTSD. You can follow the resilient pair here.)

Police dogs are an integral part of many law enforcement departments and these dogs walk the Thin Blue Line alongside our men and women of the badge. From taking down suspects on a tiring chase to detecting and locating drugs and other contraband, these upstanding canines require intensive training. Off the job, many of these canines are family dogs and enjoy time off duty like any officer should.

Search and Rescue canines play a critical role in locating those in need where humans cannot easily traverse. Four legs come in handy when climbing through piles of rubble or scaling steep slopes off the beaten trail to find a missing person.

Farm dogs also put in a serious days’ work. Herding, especially, requires sharp attention span, masterful execution of commands, and all the while, staying quick on their feet to avoid getting trampled. But farm dogs can be much more than an expert cattle or sheep herder. Guard dogs act as patrol and keep predators at bay.

Whatever the task, canines are always pushing the limits, eager to deliver and please. It’s an infectious attitude and we should all learn a little bit from these paw-somely relentless spirits.